Vintage Restoration ~ Velvet Flocking Part Two

After taking a week off working on this lovely restoration project, I am excited to bring to you Part Two. If you missed Vintage Restoration ~ Velvet Flocking Part One, please click HERE to read it now. Seeing as this beauty needed a good cleaning and there was some residual velvet fibers in some areas where I had to scrape off the old stuff, I opted to give her a nice mild bath before completing the flocking on the skirt. It is ALWAYS nerve racking when washing vintage clothing as you never know how the fabric will respond to water and chemicals. One product that I have found to be incredibly gentle and always resulted in a great outcome is Dr. Bronners Pure Castile Liquid Soap in peppermint for a nice fresh scent. As I was afraid the pink in the velvet flowers might bleed, I also added some vinegar and ensured the bath water was cold. This definitely did the trick. After hanging the dress to drip dry…it came out beautifully and had zero odor.

Since I had made the stencils previously for the velvet branches on the skirt, I carefully verified if each one still was accurate before tracing on the sheet of heat transfer. With a few spots having breaks in the old flocking, I decided to extend the stencils a bit further to achieve all over consistency. Due to the small nuances in the design, I worked on two sections at a time before proceeding onto the next.

As I cautioned you previously, I made sure there were no scraps of the heat transfer material on the skirt portion before I applied the heat from the iron. One thing I found very useful for cleaning off any loose velvet fibers was a fresh lint roller to ensure the area was 100% clean.

Painstakingly, I trimmed and verified each section to replicate as closely as possible and then applied the heat transfer material with the iron. This time, I left the protective plastic coating on each section until the end so not to damage the new flocking.

The last step was replacing the hook and eye clasp above the size zipper, since the old one was beginning to rust. The end result was even better than I had imagined, it gave this beauty new life for many more years to come.

 

 

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6 comments

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  1. Karen Mizzi

    I always love it when I see vintage items given a new lease of life. What a wonderful job you’ve done. I know it’s a labour of love, but so worth it.

  2. retropoodles

    excellent job! There’s such a satisfaction in reviving these old items, I’m going to blog about one I’ve done as well, but painting jersey fabric to match the skirt part of a damaged dress. Washing is the worst part, I’m currently waiting for my washer to stop after doing a clients fabric which had storage dust all the way down the centre front! Wish me luck!

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